Shortcomings of a Wall Flower
A nerd

Dealing with nerdy things

In an exceptionally nerdy way
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imran-suleiman:

Photographer Mattias Klum from National Geographic gets close and personal with a lion.

(via marymorstache)

tricksterity:

 

bless u spideybutt

(via marymorstache)

(x)

(Source: shuhannazy, via cathycanta)

nintendofunclub:

true story: when i was a kid i thought every seagull was the same seagull and i named them Toby

(via marymorstache)

i want to pastel my hair but i don’t want to kill it with all the bleaching i would have to do to get it there. and i would probably miss being ginger.

pufferfishh:

robespierrean:

fuckyesdeadpool:

Deadpool #10

is deadpool even a real comic

My neighbor tried to tell me Deadpool wasn’t a little gay and when i mentioned Spiderman he went “yeah, yeah okay.”

(via profitinyourpoetry)

Every Day, David Levithan (via runningfromtruth)

(via profitinyourpoetry)


excadrill:

the look

excadrill:

the look

(Source: exxxmilitary, via simplydalektable)

kateordie:

I haven’t posted anything lengthy or terribly eloquent on the subject of women in geek culture lately, have I? Have this instead.

(via simplydalektable)

freedominwickedness:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

WHOSOEVER HOLDS THIS HAMMER, IF SHE BE WORTHY, SHALL POSSESS THE POWER OF THOR.

ACTUAL GODDESS NATASHA ROMANOV

I always knew she was one :D

As is so often true of comics, a lot of the awesome is in the details. Natasha can’t move the Hammer when she first reaches it. What makes her worthy at the end when she apparently wasn’t worthy just seconds before? Look at panels 2-3 again. Natasha’s got that big ogre right on top of her with his club already going back to strike … and instead of shooting it to save herself, she uses her last shot to bring down the flying reptile that’s chasing that fleeing shuttle. That act of self-sacrifice in the face of certain death is what made her worthy.

(Source: clintonfbarton, via robinade)

thinksquad:

For Many Americans, ‘Temp’ Work Becomes Permanent Way of Life
For Americans who can’t find jobs, the booming demand for temp workers has been a path out of unemployment, but now many fear it’s a dead-end route.
With full-time work hard to find, these workers have built temping into a de facto career, minus vacation, sick days or insurance. The assignments might be temporary — a few months here, a year there — but labor economists warn that companies’ growing hunger for a workforce they can switch on and off could do permanent damage to these workers’ career trajectories and retirement plans.
Economists say it’s typical for temporary hiring to rise initially as the economy recovers, before businesses are ready to commit to hiring full-time employees. But Susan Houseman, senior economist at Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, said the current pattern doesn’t fit historic norms.
“Right now we’re seeing something interesting,” she said. “We’ve seen it surpass its previous highs, so it looks like there could be a structural shift going on, too. There’s a reason to believe we might see some increase in the use of temporary help in general.”
http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/in-plain-sight/many-americans-temp-work-becomes-permanent-way-life-n81071

thinksquad:

For Many Americans, ‘Temp’ Work Becomes Permanent Way of Life

For Americans who can’t find jobs, the booming demand for temp workers has been a path out of unemployment, but now many fear it’s a dead-end route.

With full-time work hard to find, these workers have built temping into a de facto career, minus vacation, sick days or insurance. The assignments might be temporary — a few months here, a year there — but labor economists warn that companies’ growing hunger for a workforce they can switch on and off could do permanent damage to these workers’ career trajectories and retirement plans.

Economists say it’s typical for temporary hiring to rise initially as the economy recovers, before businesses are ready to commit to hiring full-time employees. But Susan Houseman, senior economist at Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, said the current pattern doesn’t fit historic norms.

“Right now we’re seeing something interesting,” she said. “We’ve seen it surpass its previous highs, so it looks like there could be a structural shift going on, too. There’s a reason to believe we might see some increase in the use of temporary help in general.”

http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/in-plain-sight/many-americans-temp-work-becomes-permanent-way-life-n81071

(via simplydalektable)

(Source: kuwabaraaa, via suckmydirk)

combeferret:

thetimesinbetween:

4gifs:

Tiger vs. Dustbuster

THIS TIGER IS FRIGHTENED OF A DUSTBUSTER I’M CRY


THATS THE EXACT SAME BODY LANGUAGE AND REACTION A LITTLE HOUSE CAT WOULD HAVE I LOVE KITTIES SO MUCH

combeferret:

thetimesinbetween:

4gifs:

Tiger vs. Dustbuster

THIS TIGER IS FRIGHTENED OF A DUSTBUSTER I’M CRY

THATS THE EXACT SAME BODY LANGUAGE AND REACTION A LITTLE HOUSE CAT WOULD HAVE I LOVE KITTIES SO MUCH

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

(via wreck-me-felix)

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

(via robinade)